Description

This collection will review the Importance Of Oral Pathology In Clinical Dentistry

This collection is useful for all dental students

Study Set Content:
1- Page
background image

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine  

 

ISSN 2515-8260 Volume 07, Issue 10, 2020 

 

 

785 

 

Importance Of Oral Pathology In Clinical 

Dentistry

 

Dr. A.M. Sherene Christina Roshini, Dr.E.Rajesh, Dr.N.Aravindha Babu, Dr.N.Anitha 

Post graduate student. Department of Oral pathology and Microbiology 

Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital 

Bharath Institute of Higher Education and Research 

ABSTRACT- 

Dentists usually comes across hard and soft lesions of the oral cavity. Most commonly these conditions do 
not  have  a  diagnostic  crisis  for  a  dental  surgeon.  Still  the  dentistsare  sometimes  annoyed  with  a  lesion 
because  of  not  only  the challenging  diagnosis  but also  about  the  choice  of  treatment.  This  review  article 
gives  a  systematic  and  logical  approach  for  diagnosis  of  oral  lesions  which  we  come  across  in  dental 
practise. 

Key words: Dental clinician, differential diagnosis, History, oral pathology. 

INTRODUCTION 

An  oral  pathologist  needs a  good  knowledge  about  the  oral  lesions and conditions  since it is  a  fundamental 
requirement for a successful dental clinician. Usually majority of dentists detects caries or periodontitis which 
are the two most common lesions of the oral cavity. Based on the diagnosis, treatment is planned. Treatment 
plan  becomes  critical  sometimes,because  if  reversible  and  irreversible  pulpitis  or  a  benign  and  a  malignant 
neoplasm were not distinguished properly. Role of pathology is imperative for diagnosing premalignant lesion 
graded as mild, moderate or severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ.

1

Preliminary diagnosis in dental practice is 

based  upon  comprehensive  and  methodical  history  taking  and  observation  of  clinical  features.  Clinician 
sometimes confirms the diagnosis through biopsy or other methods since they should never give a diagnosis 
depending on insight or guesswork.  

STEPS FOR DIAGNOSIS (six ‘C’s) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COLLECTION 

CLASSIFICATION 

COMPARISON 

CLINICAL 

IMPRESSION 

CONFIRMATION 

CONCLUSION 

2- Page
background image

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine  

 

ISSN 2515-8260 Volume 07, Issue 10, 2020 

 

 

786 

 

 

 

STEP 1: COLLECTION 

Information  is  collected  through  thorough  history  taking,  which  is  usually  neglected.  It  is  a  professional 
responsibility  for  every  clinician  to  know  patient’s  complete  medical  history  since  it  may  affect  dental 
treatment.  Another  importantthing  is  to  take  medication  histories  in  order  to  prevent  medication  errors  and 
related  risks  to  patients  and  also  to  detect  drug-related  clinical  and/or  pathological  changes.

2

Although 

diagnosis  appears  to  be  self-evident  by  inspection  alone,  existing  diseases  might  be  undetected  and 
untreated.

3

History  taking  promotes  a  good  doctor-patient  relationship  and  it  also  saves  the  necessity  for 

expensive laboratory procedures. 

STEP 2: CLASSIFICATION 

Oral lesions are categorized based upon: 

 

Colour change (white, red, blue, pigmented or combined), 

 

 

Loss  of  integrity  of  the  mucous  membrane  (erosion,  fissure,  or  ulcer,  which  may  be  primary  or 
secondary),

 

 

Growth or swelling,

 

 

Lesions involves tooth and/or bone, either alone or combined with other soft tissue lesions,

 

 

Syndrome 

 

When an oral lesion is detected by a dentist,  he/she should first try to  categorize the lesion based on any of 
these categories.  

STEP 3: COMPARISON 

Differential  diagnosis  plays  a  major  role  in  diagnosing  an  oral  lesion.  Following  factors  are  considered  for 
differential diagnosis:  

 

 

Clinical appearance might predict the nature of the lesions. 

 

 

Certain sites are common for some lesionse.g., Pyogenic granuloma is commonly seen in gingiva and 
unlikely to be observed on floor of the mouth; Ranula is usually observed on the floor of the mouth 
and is not on gingiva. 

 

 

Palpation of the lesions provide an indication of the nature of the lesions. 

 

3- Page
background image

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine  

 

ISSN 2515-8260 Volume 07, Issue 10, 2020 

 

 

787 

 

 

Colour of the lesionis very useful for detecting a lesion e.g., Leukoplakia (homogenous white lesion) 
can be observed in persons who have tobacco consuming habit;Amalgam tattoo (pigmented lesion in 
the gingiva due to faulty Class II amalgam restoration). 

 

 

Radiographs  are  necessary  for  intrabony  lesions  for  detecting  whether  it  is  radiolucent  (for,  e.g., 
ameloblastoma,  keratocyst),  radiopaque  (for,  e.g.,  osteoma,  odontoma)  or  mixed  (for,  e.g., 
Pindborgtumor, Gorlin cyst). Certain lesions have a specific radiographic characteristic which helps in 
diagnosise.g., cotton wool appearance of Paget disease, moth-eaten feature of osteomyelitis, sun-ray 
manifestation of osteosarcoma, and ground glass appearance of fibrous dysplasia. 

 

 

However,  a  dental  clinician  should  not  come  to  a  diagnosis  based  on  radiographic  appearance  only 
because  e.g.,  cotton  wool  appearance  is  not  limited  to  Paget  disease  but  can  also  observed  in 
condensing osteitis. 

 

STEP 4: CLINICAL IMPRESSION 

A dental clinician must correlate with history, age, gender, clinical characteristics (appearance, site, location, 
signs  and  symptoms),  radiological  appearance  and  other  possible  causes  before  arriving  to  a  definite 
diagnosis. 

EXAMPLES:  

 

A white line on the buccal mucosa along the occlusal level is undoubtfully linea alba and it does not 
need either investigations nor treatment. 

 

 

Leukoedema  -  a  bilateral  white  lesion  on  the  mucosa  which  disappears  while  stretching  buccal 
mucosa. does not offer any difficulty in diagnosis. However, diagnosis is not always that simple. 

 

Following flowchart gives a logical approach to a white lesion of the oral mucosa and diagnostic criteria for a 
gingival growth or swelling. 

Figure 1: Logical approach to a white lesion of the oral mucosa 

 

 

 

 

 

4- Page
background image

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine  

 

ISSN 2515-8260 Volume 07, Issue 10, 2020 

 

 

788 

 

 

 

Figure 2: Gingival growth or swelling 

 

STEP 5: CONFIRMATION 

 

For some lesions even thoughthe dental clinician  aredefiniteabout clinical diagnosis, confirmation is 
necessary. 

 

 

In  certain  situation,  radiographs  (intra  oral  periapical,  orthopantomogram,  or  computed  tomography 
scan  etc.,)  or  laboratory  investigations  (HIV  testing,  serum  Ca  and  alkaline  phosphatase  levels, 
haemoglobin estimation) or exfoliative cytology or biopsyare required for confirmation. 

 

 

 Dental  Clinicianmay  accomplish  procedures  like  punch  biopsy  on  their  own.  The  following  Table 
tabulate oral lesions suitable for biopsy in general dental practice. 

 

Table 1: ORAL LESIONS SUITABLE FOR BIOPSY IN GENERAL 

DENTAL PRACTICE 

 

 

Fibroma (fibroepithelial polyp, fibrous epulis, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, irritation 
fibroma) 

 

 

Pyogenic granuloma 

 

 

Peripheral giant cell granuloma 

 

 

Papilloma Mucocele (with care not to rupture it) 

 

 

Lichen planus (if diagnosis is unclear)

 

 

5- Page
background image

European Journal of Molecular & Clinical Medicine  

 

ISSN 2515-8260 Volume 07, Issue 10, 2020 

 

 

789 

 

 

Larger lesions or suspicious malignancies need an incisional biopsy but smaller lesions < 1 cm should 
be excised completely. 

 

 

Tissue for biopsy should becollected carefully from a particular site of the lesion and it is placed in a 
wide-mouthed container with 10% buffered formalin for fixation.

 

 

 If it is a bloody specimen, then it must be washed in saline before placing in the fixative; the fixative 
volume should be at least 10 times the volume of the specimen for optimal and rapid fixation.

4

 

 

Saline is not an alternative for formalin fixation. Some studies have expressed that if tissue for biopsy 
is placed in saline for 1 hr, and then placed in formalin fixative, tissue distortion (cell vacuolization in 
basal  layer  of  epithelium  and  decreased  cohesiveness  of  collagen  fibres  in  the  connective 
tissue)occurs. Hence diagnosis appears to be problematic.

5

 

 

 In case of immunofluorescence, two tissue samples are necessary for vesiculobullous lesions and/or 
autoimmune disorders: 

 

 

One in formalin for routine staining and 

 

 

Other in Michel’s solution for direct immunofluorescence. 

6

 

 

Container must be compactly sealed and properly labelled with patient’s name, age, gender and site. 
In case biopsy has been taken from multiple sites, different bottles are used denoting the site (right or 
left sides). 

 

 

Then specimen should be handed over to an oral pathologist with relevant documents. 

 

STEP 6: CONCLUSION 

Dentistry  is  an  art.  Earlier  diagnosis  depends  upon  the  history  and  clinical  features.  The  dental  clinician 
should  concentrate  several  causative  factors  and  possible  diagnostic  factors  –  where  clinician  may  require 
collection  of  more  information  and  in-depth  clinical  examination.  At  certain  times,  when  there  is  no 
correlation  between  clinical  diagnosis  and  etiological  factors  or  the  laboratory  results  or  radiological 
investigations, the pathology (biopsy report) issues the final diagnosis.  

REFERENCE 

1.

 

Izumo T. Oral premalignant lesions: From the pathological viewpoint. Int J Clin Oncol 2011;16:15-26. 

 

2.

 

 Fitzgerald  RJ.  Medication  errors:  The  importance  of  an  accurate  drug  history.  Br  J  Clin  Pharmacol 
2009;67:671-5. 

 

3.

 

 Newsome P, Smales R, Yip K. Oral diagnosis and treatment planning: Part 1. Introduction. Br Dent J 
2012;213:15-9. 

 

4.

 

 Kim  S,  Christopher  L,  Bancroft  JD,  editors.  Bancroft’s  Theory  and  Practice  of  Histological 
Techniques. 7th ed. Philadelphia, USA: Elsevier Health Sciences; 2013. p. 81. 

 

5.

 

 Sengupta S, Prabhat K, Gupta V, Vij H, Vij R, Sharma V. Artefacts produced by normal saline when 
used as a holding solution for biopsy tissues in transit. J Maxillofac Oral Surg 2014;13:148-51. 

 

6.

 

 Rosebush  MS,  Anderson  KM,  Rawal  SY,  Mincer  HH,  Rawal  YB.  The  oral  biopsy:  Indications, 
techniques and special considerations. J Tenn Dent Assoc 2010;90:17-20.

 

thumb_up_alt Subscribers
layers 5 Items
folder Dentistry Category
0.00
0 Reviews