Description

In this collection we will review many important informations for dental students

Study Set Content:
1- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Endo Diagnosis 

-

 

Endodontic objective – absence of apical periodontitis (clinically, radiographically, histologically) 

o

 

Prevention and treatment 

-

 

Endodontic disease – from microorganisms from trauma, caries, and periodontal disease 

o

 

Progression – pulpitis, periodontitis, abscess 

-

 

Endodontic triad – debridement, sterilization, obturation 

-

 

Diagnosis – art of distinguishing one disease from another 

SOAP – subjective findings, objective findings, assessment (diagnosis), plan 

-

 

Medical history 

o

 

Bisphosphonates 

o

 

Allergies – latex, medications 

o

 

Uncontrolled diabetes 

o

 

Infectious diseases 

o

 

Infective endocarditis prophylaxis 

o

 

Medications – immunosuppressives, corticosteroids, anticoagulants 

-

 

Dental history 

-

 

Chief complaint 

o

 

Pain, swelling, loose tooth, broken tooth, discolored tooth 

o

 

“Quotation marks” very useful in the record 

-

 

History of present illness 

o

 

Inception – when did problem/discomfort begin? Have you ever noticed it before? 

o

 

Frequency and course – how often does this discomfort occur? Are the episodes more or less frequent 
or about the same as when they first started? 

o

 

Intensity – is the discomfort mild, moderate, severe? Patient’s verbal rating of pain from 0-10? 

o

 

Quality – sharp, bright, dull, throbbing? 

o

 

Location 

 

McCarthy’s conclusions – patients experiencing periradicular pain (89%) can localize 
painful tooth significantly more often than patients with pulpal pain w/o periradicular 
symptoms (30%). Posteriors harder to localize than anteriors. 

 

Can you point to the tooth that hurts/area you feel is swollen? 

 

Were you ever able to tell which tooth was hurting? 

 

Can you tell if discomfort is upper/lower or right/left side? 

 

Does the discomfort start in one place and spread to another? 

o

 

Provoking factors – do heat/cold, biting or chewing cause discomfort? 

o

 

Duration – does discomfort linger when caused? 

o

 

Spontaneity – does the discomfort ever occur all by itself? 

o

 

Attenuating factors – does anything make the discomfort better/worse? 

 

Hot/cold liquids 

 

Sitting up/laying down, bending over 

 

Analgesics 

 

 

2- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Diagnostic Procedures – order doesn’t matter, consistency does 

-

 

Radiographic examination – state of pulp tissue, even if necrotic, cannot be determined radiographically 

o

 

Caries 

o

 

Past vital pulp therapy – direct and indirect pulp caps 

o

 

Extensive restorations 

o

 

Previous RCT – pulpotomy, pulpectomy, nonsurgical RCT, surgical RCT 

o

 

Root canal calcifications – calcified canals, pulp canal obliteration (calcific metamorphosis), pulp stones 

o

 

Lesions of endodontic origins 

o

 

Internal (circular, continuous) vs external (non-uniform, irregular) resorption 

-

 

Clinical examination 

o

 

Visual Extraoral 

 

Swellings, Lymph node exam, Sinus tracts 

o

 

Visual Intraoral 

 

Hard tissues – caries, discoloration, fractures, cracked teeth, vertical root fractures, occlusion 

 

Soft tissues – swellings, sinus tracts, periodontal status 

o

 

Diagnostic tests – (S = positive, NS = negative) 

 

Percussion – apical inflammation 

 

Test by digital (finger), then instrument handle 

 

Horizontal and vertical vectors 

 

Palpation – apical inflammation, swelling 

 

Periodontal probings 

 

I – furcation not open 

 

II – can feel furcation, can’t go through it 

 

III – can go through furcation 

 

IV – can see through furcation 

 

Vitality tests – electric pulp test, temperature tests 

o

 

Aδ – sharp pain, low threshold, EPT and cold test 

 

Not fully formed until 5y after tooth eruption 

o

 

C – dull pain, high threshold, heat tests 

 

True nociceptive nerves, resistant to necrosis 

 

EPT – set rate no higher than 4, test on “normal” tooth first 

 

Thermal tests – differentiate between reversible and irreversible pulpitis 

 

Cold tests – test response (S, NS) and lingering (L, NL) 

 

Lingers for ??? considered irreversible 

o

 

Ice stick – 0

o

C, Not for full coverage teeth 

 

Melting ice on adjacent areas may give false positive 

o

 

Endo ice – -26.2

o

C, Tests 3-4 teeth per application 

 

Spray for 3s from 5.0mm distance, shake off excess 

 

Hot tests 

o

 

Burlew wheel, Hot gutta-percha, Hot ball burnisher 

 

Problems with these 3 

 

Temperature can be raised 20

o

 in 20s 

 

Increases >20

o

 can cause pulpal damage 

 

Temperature no greater than 140

0

F to prevent irreversible pulpal injury 

o

 

Elements/system B – system of choice for “hot” testing 

3- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

 

 

Mobility 

 

Transillumination 

 

Sinus tracts 

 

Record presence or absence 

 

Trace with sterile 30 or 35 0.02 tapered gutta percha point 

o

 

Can radiograph to ID associated tooth/areas 

 

Selective anesthesia – very helpful when attempting to rule out an arch/referred pain 

 

Anesthetize primary source of pain 

o

 

Block vs infiltration 

o

 

Mandibular vs maxillary anesthesia 

 

Do NOT use PDL injection to ID source of pain 

 

Direct dentinal stimulation 

 

Used ONLY when all other test procedures have yielded equivocal results 

-

 

Additional considerations 

o

 

Referred pain 

 

Pain in anterior from anterior tooth? Pain in posterior from posterior tooth? 

 

Pain rarely referred across midline 

 

Anterior teeth do NOT refer mandibular pain to maxillary, or vice versa 

 

Posterior teeth CAN refer mandibular pain to maxillary, and vice versa 

o

 

Maxillary sinusitis 

 

Medical history – history of sinusitis, recent cold or flu 

 

History of present illness – postural component 

o

 

Cracked teeth 

 

Erratic pain on mastication 

 

Patient has trouble explaining complaint, radiographically inconclusive 

 

Sometimes cold sensitive, NOT percussion sensitive 

 

Long history of pain, treatment failed to resolve symptoms 

o

 

Bradontalgia – tooth change from change in atmospheric pressure 

Terminology – refer to diagnostic terminology handout 

o

 

Apical – by the apex 

o

 

Periapical – around apical portion of the rooth 

o

 

Periradicular – surrounding the root 

-

 

2 part diagnosis – pulpal and apical 

 

 

4- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Access Cavity Prep 

Rubber Dam 

-

 

Rubber dam required for all endo cases – standard of care 

o

 

Protection of patient 

o

 

Creates aseptic environment, infection control 

o

 

Enhances vision, makes treatment more efficient 

o

 

Retracts tissue, soft tissues are protected from laceration chemical agents and medicaments 

o

 

Irrigation solutions confined to the operating field 

o

 

Protects patient from swallowing aspirating instruments and/or materials 

o

 

Generally, medium weight non-latex type 

-

 

Rubber Dam Retainers 

o

 

Anterior –#9 or #212 

o

 

Premolars - # 0 or 2 

o

 

Molars - # 14, 14A, 56 

-

 

Dam Placement 

o

 

Evaluate ability to isolate – oraseal caulking can be used to seal, prevent saliva from getting into access 

o

 

Periodontal support 

o

 

Restorability, caries, defective restorations/leaking margins 

o

 

Crown lengthening 

o

 

Cost/tx plan, consent 

Access Prep 

-

 

Objectives 

o

 

Remove all caries, conserve tooth structure 

o

 

Completely unroof pulp chamber, remove all coronal pulp tissue 

o

 

Local all root canal orifices 

o

 

Achieve straight line access to apical constriction or initial curvature of canal 

o

 

Establish restorative margins to minimize marginal leakage of restored tooth 

o

 

Consider multiple tooth isolation – short clinical crown, retainers not in way of radiographs, etc 

-

 

Other Considerations 

o

 

Until RD is in place, broaches and files CANNOT be used 

o

 

All unsupported tooth/restorative structure must be removed 

o

 

Radiographs may include off angle bitewings and Pas 

 

Estimated access length 

 

 

5- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

-

 

Laws of Symmetry 

o

 

Law of Centrality – floor of pulp chamber always at center of tooth at level of CEJ 

o

 

Law of Concentricity – external root surface anatomy reflects internal pulp chamber anatomy 

o

 

Law of the CEJ – distance of external surface of clinical crown vs wall of pulp chamber is the same 
throughout the circumference of tooth at level of CEJ 

o

 

CEJ – most consistent repeatable landmark for locating pulp chamber 

o

 

1

st

 Law of Symmetry – except for Mx molars, canal orifices are equidistant from line drawn mesio/disto 

across center of pulp chamber floor 

o

 

2

nd

 Law of Symmetry – except for Mx molars, canal orifices lie on line perpendicular to above line 

o

 

Law of Color Change – pulp chamber floor always DARKER than the walls 

o

 

1

st

 Law of the Orifice – orifices of the canals ALWAYS located at junction of walls and the floor 

o

 

2

nd

 Law of the Orifice – orifices of the canals ALWAYS located at the angles in the floor-wall junction 

o

 

3

rd

 Law of the Orifice – orifices of the canals ALWAYS located at terminus of roots developmental fusion 

lines 

-

 

Access Preparation 

o

 

Use a #2, 4, or 6 friction grip round bur 

o

 

Endo Z bur (tapered safe ended bur) 

o

 

Sharp endo explorer 

o

 

Magnification 

o

 

Long shanked low speed burs 

o

 

Ultrasonics, transillumination, dye staining, irrigation and interim radiographs 

Accessing Teeth 

-

 

Mx Incisors – always 1 root 1 canal 

o

 

Young patients = triangular, older patients = ovoid 

-

 

Mx canines – always 1 root 1 canal 

o

 

Ovoid 

o

 

In middle 1/3 of lingual surface 

-

 

Mx Premolars 

o

 

Outline form ovoid facial/lingual 

o

 

Mesial concavity at CEJ 

o

 

When 2 canals are present, under B and L cusps 

-

 

Mx Molars 

o

 

Outline form triangular in mesial ½ of tooth 

 

Base = facial, apex = lingual 

o

 

Oblique ridge left intact (usually) 

o

 

MB canal slightly distal to MB cusp tip, broad B/L, may have MB2 canal 

 

MB2 canal 1-3mm lingual to MB1, slightly mesial to line drawn from MB1 to PC 

o

 

DB canal distal and slightly lingual to main MB canal, in line with buccal groove 

o

 

P canal slightly distal to ML cusp tip, largest canal 

-

 

Mn incisors – 25-40% have 2 canals 

 

Facial easier to locate, generally more straight 

 

Lingual often shielded by a lingual shelf 

o

 

Outline form, shape, and access similar to Mx incisors 

 

 

6- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

-

 

Mn canines – 30% have 2 canals 

o

 

Ovoid 

o

 

Middle 1/3 of lingual surface 

-

 

Mn Premolars – 25% have 2 canals  

o

 

Ovoid B/L 

o

 

Buccal to central groove 

-

 

Mn Molars – 30-40% chance 2

nd

 canal in distal root 

o

 

Rectangular 

o

 

MB canal slightly distal to MB cusp tip 

o

 

ML canal orifice in area of central groove, slightly distal compared to MB canal 

Errors in Access 

-

 

Inadequate preparation 

-

 

Excess removal 

 

 

7- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Instruments and Materials 

Medical Emergencies 

o

 

Aging patient population 

o

 

More medications 

o

 

Dental pain/infection 

-

 

Epi-pen = 0.3mg (Epi-pen Jr. = 0.15mg) 

o

 

Check window for expiration 

o

 

Take off blue cap 

 hold orange tip against thigh 

 syringe auto injects within 10s 

-

 

Nitrates 

o

 

Prime pump first – do NOT shake) 

o

 

Spray under tongue – do NOT swallow, expectorate, or rinse for 5-10min 

 

Can be used every 3-5min for first 15min 

o

 

Don’t forget to check BP and call 911 

-

 

Albuterolol 

o

 

Shake well and take off cap 

o

 

Tell patient to breathe out and take a deep breath as they inhale spray 

o

 

Hold breath as long as possible 

o

 

Repeat if needed 

-

 

Low blood sugar 

o

 

Glutose 15 

 use before patient is unconscious 

o

 

Rip off tip and squeeze entire contents into mouth, then swallow 

-

 

Other medications 

o

 

Diphenhydramine (antihistamine) 

o

 

Aspirin 

Prescription Writing 

-

 

Ancient prescriptions found in both Chinese and Egyptian writing 

o

 

Fill in patients name 

o

 

Requires date – controlled substance prescriptions have a time limit 

o

 

Rx symbol (take though) – list drug and strength here (trade/generic name, __mg) 

o

 

Disp – number of tablets patient should receive 

o

 

Sig (mark thou) – directions for patient 

o

 

Write in number of refills 

o

 

Sign prescription and include phone number 

o

 

Write DEA# (do NOT have this printed on prescription pads) for controlled substances 

 

 

8- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

-

 

Common Abbreviations 

ac – before meals 
hs – at bedtime 
pc – after eating 
prn – when needed 
stat – immediately 
ut dict – as directed 

po – by mouth 
pr – rectally 
c – with 
s – without 
 

qd – every day 
qod – every other day 
bid – twice daily 
tid – 3x daily 
qid – 4x daily 

g/gm – gram 
gr – grain 
tbsp – tablespoon 
tsp – teaspoon 

cap – capsule 
gtts – drops 

o

 

Write clearly 

o

 

Use metric and zeroes with decimals 

o

 

Include reminder of intended purpose of medication with directions (ex:// for pain) 

o

 

Do NOT use abbreviations 

-

 

Narcotics 

o

 

Schedule 1 – marijuana, heroin 

o

 

Schedule 2 – Percodan, Tylox 

o

 

Schedule 3 – Vicodin 

o

 

Schedule 4 – valium, Darvocet N 

o

 

Schedule 5 – anti-diarrhea meds, codeine containing cough syrups 

 

Schedule 2 – most be written prescription (except emergencies) and only enough for 24h period 

 

Must include written copy to dispenser, no refills allowed 

 

Schedule 3-5 – 6month time limit, NMT 5 refills 

-

 

Completing Prescriptions 

o

 

Print from axiom, have instructor sign 

o

 

If scheduled drug, BNDD number needed 

Pulp and Periradicular Tissues 

-

 

Dental Pulp – loose CT with unique features 

o

 

Rigid, noncompliant environment 

o

 

Lacks collateral circulation 

-

 

Pulpal pathosis 

o

 

Irritants – microbial, chemical, mechanical 

-

 

Periradicular pathosis 

o

 

Preceded by pulpal pathosis 

o

 

Periradicular lesions result from bacteria and their byproducts 

o

 

Apical periodontitis is BOTH protective and destructive 

-

 

Nonsurgical Root Canal Treatment 

o

 

Clean and shape root canal system 

 

Debridement of root canal system 

 

Enlarge and shape canals to facilitate obturation 

 

Create apical seat to contain obturating material 

o

 

Obturate root canal system 

 

Create bacterial/fluid tight seal along length of root canal system from coronal to apex 

 

Use gutta percha, sealer, definitive coronal seal 

o

 

Maintain health/promote healing and repair of periradicular tissues 

o

 

Alleviate symptoms/prevent future adverse clinical signs/symptoms 

9- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Examination 

-

 

Etiology 

o

 

Carious lesion causes bacterial infection, leading to periapical granuloma 

-

 

Diagnosis and treatment plan 

-

 

Case selection and referral 

-

 

Treatment 

-

 

Prognosis 

Sinus Tracts 

-

 

Is NOT a dental fistula 

o

 

Fistula = communication between 2 internal organs/organ and body surface 

o

 

Sinus tract = tract leading from area of inflammation to an epithelial surface 

-

 

Fairly evenly distributed between Mx and Mn (of 758, 400 Mx and 358 Mn) 

o

 

1600 teeth with PA lesions, 136 had sinus tracts (8.5%) 

 

87.5% open to facial side 

 

5.8% open to palatal 

 

5.1% found extraorally 

 

1.5% perforate Mn lingual sulcus 

-

 

In Monkeys, need >100 days to form sinus tract 

o

 

100-200days = 46% of openly exposed teeth develop sinus tracts (none epithelial lined) 

o

 

>200 days = 4/7 sinus tracts lined by epithelium 

-

 

Dentoalveolar sinus tract – usually route of drainage from inflammatory PA lesion 

o

 

Follows path of least resistance through bone, periosteum, and mucosa 

o

 

Usually close to source of drainage, but may be some distance as well 

Radiography 

-

 

Aids in diagnosis 

-

 

Visualization of anatomy 

-

 

Used for estimating working length 

Rubber Dam 

-

 

Potential leakage 

o

 

Subgingival caries 

o

 

Fractures 

o

 

Defective restorations 

o

 

Open margins 

 

 

10- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Hand Instruments 

-

 

Endo explorer – long tapered tines at either a right or obtuse angle (facilitates locating canal orifice) 

o

 

Very stuff, not for condensing gutta percha 

o

 

Should not be heated 

-

 

Spoon excavator – long shanked and used to remove caries, deep temporary cement, or coronal pulp tissue 

o

 

Has both right and left hand orientated positions 

o

 

Should not be heated 

-

 

Hand files – usually 21mm, 25mm, or 31mm in length 

o

 

Spiral cutting edge of instrument is 16mm long 

 

Diameter increases by 0.02mm per running length mm 

 

D

0

 at tip, D

16

 at end of spiral cutting edge 

o

 

Tip angle = 75

o

 +15

o

 

o

 

Color code – different files for each diameter 

 

Each diameter increases by 0.05mm up to size 60 

 

Each diameter increases by 0.10mm from size 60-140 

o

 

K-files – designed with cutting, partial cutting, and non-cutting tips 

 

Glides file through canal and aids in canal enlargement 

o

 

Hedstrom – designed for cutting and enlarging canals 

 

Cutting edge is inclined backwards 

 

Ground from stainless steel wire 

o

 

Gates Gliddens – designed for cleaning and enlarging coronal 1/3 of pulp canal 

-

 

Finger ruler 

-

 

Working length file – should end 1mm from root apex, just coronal to apical constriction 

-

 

Irrigating agent – sodium hypochlorite (bleach) 

o

 

Adjunctive equipment 

o

 

Irrigating needle 

o

 

Chelator and lubricant 

 

Use of EDTA for extended periods may be detrimental to dentinal tubules 

Evaluation of Canal Preparation 

-

 

Cleaning 

o

 

Glassy smooth walls 

o

 

Elimination of intracanal debris 

-

 

Shaping 

o

 

Proper canal size/taper 

o

 

Apical preparation determination 

-

 

Drying 

o

 

Canal is dried with paper points 

 

 

11- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Obturation 

-

 

Standardized gutta percha 

-

 

Finger spreaders 

o

 

Size = medium fine, fine 

o

 

Composition = stainless steel, nickel titanium 

-

 

Sealers (ZOE) 

o

 

Roth’s sealer 

o

 

Grossman’s sealer 

-

 

Master Cone Radiograph 

o

 

Sealer 

o

 

Master cone 

o

 

Accessory cones 

o

 

Corrected working length 

-

 

Obturating machines 

o

 

9-11 heated plugger 

o

 

System B 

 

220

o

F – making post space 

 

250

o

F – searing at orifices 

 

Can also be used for gutta percha removal 

-

 

Cotton pellet – covers access prep 

Restoration 

-

 

Temporary – cavit/IRM double seal, glass inomer 

-

 

Definitive – composite, amalgam 

-

 

Final radiograph assessment 

o

 

Obturation – length, density, taper, coronal termination 

o

 

Thickness of temporary 

o

 

Compare against recall radiographs 

Summary 

-

 

NSRCT – predictable procedure with appropriate diagnosis and treatment planning 

-

 

Tooth retention from NSRCT preferred treatment for periodontally stable restorable teeth 

-

 

Better to preserve natural dentition than extraction/implant 

 

 

12- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Cleaning and Shaping the Root Canal System 

-

 

Debridement – removal of irritants (bacteria, tissue, etc) from canal system 

-

 

Chemomechanical – instrumentation and irrigation 

-

 

Cleaning – ideally instruments contact and plane walls to loosen debris 

o

 

NaOCl – dissolved organic matter, destroys bacteria 

o

 

Irrigants – flush loosened/suspended debris/sludge from canal space 

Irrigation 

-

 

Lubrication, flush debris from canal, disinfection, tissue dissolution, removes smear layer 

-

 

NaOCl – oxidative action on sulfhydryl groups of bacterial by HOCl 

o

 

Bactericidal - inhibits enzymes, disrupts metabolism, causes cell death 

 

NaOCl + H

2

 NaOH + HOCl 

 

HOCl = active biocide, dissolves organic tissue 

o

 

5.0% highly toxic compared to 0.5% 

-

 

Technique – syringe with irrigating needle 

o

 

Requires safety glasses – can damage tissue, ruin clothing 

o

 

Rubber dam isolation with seal (oraseal) 

o

 

Passive and slow injection of solution into canal 

 

Never force needle into canal, closer to apex = greater risk of injury 

o

 

Files can carry irrigating solution further into canals 

 

Capillary action of smaller diameter canals causes solution retention 

 

Excess solution aspirated away with needle 

o

 

Frequent irrigation = less debris and less apical blockage 

-

 

Ideal Irrigant 

o

 

Provides lubrication during instrumentation 

o

 

Flushes debris from canal, removes smear layer 

o

 

Dissolves organics in fins and isthmi, bactericidal 

o

 

Low cytotoxicity 

Dry vs Wet Instrumentation 

-

 

Dry instrumentation 

o

 

Apical extrusion of material negligible 

o

 

More difficult to instrument canals – easier to plug apex with debris 

o

 

Instruments more likely to jam and separate 

-

 

Wet instrumentation 

o

 

Apical extrusion dependent on canal length and file size 

o

 

Less difficult to instrument canals 

o

 

No instrument separation 

-

 

Tissue Dissolution 

o

 

Solvent action limited by surface contact, volume, and exchange of solution 

 

Amount of organic matter 

 

Frequency and intensity of mechanical agitation (fluid flow) 

 

Available surface area of free or enclosed tissue (larger surface area = faster dissolution) 

 

 

13- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Bleach Toxicity 

-

 

Toxic effect is 10x greater than antimicrobial effect 

-

 

NaOCl cytotoxic to all but heavily keratinized cells 

o

 

Very caustic, nonspecific agent – serious consequences from apical passage of NaOCl 

-

 

Apical passage of NaOCl 

o

 

Excruciating pain for 2-5min 

 

Immediate swelling with spread to surrounding CT 

 

Profuse bleeding either interstitially or intraorally throughout root canal system 

o

 

Severe pain replaced with constant discomfort 

 

Potential for permanent paresthesia 

-

 

Treatment 

o

 

Alleviate swelling with cold packs, warm saline soaks for following days 

o

 

Pain control with LA and analgesics 

o

 

Rx antibiotics – prevent spread of primary infection, increase susceptibility of secondary infection 

o

 

Reassure patient 

Smear Layer 

-

 

NaOCl does NOT remove smear layer 

-

 

REDTA DOES remove smear layer leaving no debris behind 

-

 

NaOCl and RCPrep (EDTA + 10% urea peroxide + Carbowax) – smeared surface with more superficial debris 

Difficulties with Instrumentation (Case selection) 

-

 

Pulpal space 

o

 

Calcification 

o

 

Chamber size and shape 

o

 

Orifice size and shape 

o

 

Canal size and shape – may be very complex 

 

Canals may join, separate, and differ in length 

 

Electronic Apical Locator may be helpful 

o

 

Number of canals 

-

 

Root morphology 

o

 

Curvature 

 

Dilacerations 

 

Long roots 

 

Recurvature 

o

 

Length 

 

Long 

 

Short 

-

 

Occlusal Access 

o

 

Looking for MB2 on Mx molars 

o

 

Large enough to: 

 

Visualize pulpal floor 

 

Illuminate pulpal floor 

 

Visualize subpulpal groove map 

 

Develop straight line access 

o

 

Usually requires removal of dentin shelf on mesial wall 

14- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Cleaning and Shaping 

-

 

Continuously tapered form that holds filling material within the canal 

-

 

Maintains original anatomy and conserves root structure 

-

 

Maintain position of apical foramen without over-enlarging 

-

 

Shaping facilitates cleaning 

o

 

Allows irrigant access 

o

 

File shape, irrigant cleaning 

 

-

 

Small file (scout access) 

-

 

Straight line access – may require coronal flaring 

-

 

Enlarge to size 20 for estimated working length (minimal file size) 

-

 

Irrigate 

Gates Gliddens 

-

 

Side cutting 

-

 

Used for straight portion of canal 

-

 

Used serially and passively with successively smaller sizes at greater depths 

-

 

Used to brush away restrictive dentin and provide straight line access 

-

 

Irrigate after each GG use 

-

 

Cutting head diameters 

o

 

#2 – size 70 

o

 

#3 – size 90 

o

 

#4 – size 110 

Shaping and Access 

-

 

Coronally, prepare AWAY from the furcation 

o

 

Be aware of danger zones 

 

Mesial concavity of mesial root of Mn molars 

 

Distal wall of MB root of Mx molars 

-

 

Anticurvature techniques 

o

 

Precurve files 

o

 

Instrument with pressure towards curve and coronally 

o

 

Balanced force hand instrumentation 

-

 

Checking canals 

o

 

CWL – usually #20 file, may be larger 

o

 

MAF – largest file used at corrected working length 

o

 

May want to use different files (K-files and hedstroms) to differentiate between canals in radiograph 

-

 

Improving cleaning 

o

 

Combining both hand instrumentation and rotary 

-

 

Apical Foramen Resorption – natural constriction may be destroyed 

 

Set working length shorter = 1.5mm 

 

May be difficult to obtain apical seat 

o

 

Apical stop – MAF and next smaller file do not go beyond working length 

o

 

Apical seat – MAF does not go beyond working length, but next smaller file does. 

 

Resistance with smaller file is felt 

o

 

Open Apex – MAF goes beyond working length, no resistance is felt by smaller file 

15- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Step Back Preparation 

-

 

Hand instruments – enlarge canal 3 file sizes larger than first file that bound at corrected working length 

-

 

Each step back is 0.5mm shorter, but 1 file size larger 

o

 

Irrigate, recapitulate, irrigate, work with next step back file 

o

 

Recapitulation is always MAF size set to corrected working length 

-

 

Access 

 instrumentation 

o

 

ID canal orifices, scout coronal 2/3

rd

 of canal with #10 file 

o

 

Scout with Gates Gliddens and flare orifice – straight line access allows for file entry without deflection 

 

#2 GG 6mm into orifice 

 

#3 GG 3mm into orifice 

-

 

Minimal file for estimated working length should be a #20 

o

 

For >1mm difference between EWL and CWL, take a new radiograph 

-

 

Enlarge to MAF (usually at least #35) at CWL 

o

 

Step back preparation, 0.5mm steps 

o

 

Irrigate and recapitulate between each step 

-

 

Place MAF at corrected working length for MAF radiograph 

Pre-Obturation Evaluation 

-

 

Glassy smooth walls 

-

 

Canal clean of dentin and irrigant 

-

 

Spreader penetrates to 1mm from CWL 

-

 

Canal shape reflects natural root shape 

-

 

Accurate ID of apical foramen 

Common Errors 

-

 

Ledge formation 

o

 

Caused from uncurved file short of CWL gouging dentin, creating ledge blocking file from getting to CWL 

o

 

Corrected by bending file tip 45

o

 to tease it past the ledge 

-

 

Transportation of apical canal 

o

 

Non-precurved file can straighten a curved canal, possibly causing an apical perforation 

-

 

Strip perforation 

 

Cervical portion of file straightens canal in multirooted teeth 

 

Communication on furcal side of root 

o

 

Prevented by good straight line access 

 

Avoid furcation region of canal when filing 

 

Use smaller file sizes in very curved canals 

-

 

Separated instruments 

o

 

Prevented via discarding worn instruments 

o

 

Avoid binding instruments in canal 

o

 

Always instrument wet/irrigate 

-

 

Canal blockage 

o

 

Prevented via copious irrigation/recapitulation, not instrumenting on dry canal, don’t force files down, 
removing materials that may fall in and block canal (amalgam, IRM, etc), using files sequentially 

o

 

Cleaned with a small file at CWL 

-

 

Overinstrumentation (beyond apex) 

o

 

Prevented via an accurate CWL before instrumentation with larger files 

16- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Radiography 

-

 

Diagnosis/Case Selection Aid – # of roots/canals, curvatures, calcification, hard/soft tissue alterations 

-

 

Treatment Process Aid – EWL/CWL, localize difficult to find canals, determine relative position buccolingually 

-

 

Aid in evaluating patient’s response to treatment 

Endodontic Radiographs 

-

 

Periapicals – diagnostic radiographs, working radiographs, post-op radiographs 

-

 

Bitewings (vertical) – RESTORATIVE ASSESSMENT, caries ID, location of pulp chamber, vertical defects 

-

 

Pan, occlusal, CBCT – difficult diagnosis, presurgical treatment planning for assessment of vital structures 

-

 

FMX – history of teeth (restorations, PA lesion progression, etc) 

Diagnostic Radiographs 

-

 

Evaluate difficulty of case (case selection) 

o

 

Chamber and canal morphology 

 

Calcified or obliterated chamber/canals, pulp stones 

 

Internal root resorption 

o

 

Root morphology 

 

Length, curvature, recurvature 

 

Number, fused roots, possible C-shaped roots 

 

External root resorption 

o

 

Crown, root, or alveolar fractures 

o

 

Previous endo access/treatment 

 

Perforations, separated files, blocked/ledged canals 

o

 

Periodontal bone loss, periapical pathosis 

o

 

Proximity of anatomic structures 

 

Sinus, mandibular canal, mental nerve 

o

 

Ease of exposing radiographs on patient 

 

Small mouth, large tongue, shallow palate 

-

 

The more info, the better 

o

 

Case selection, anticipate anatomy, anticipate problems with isolation 

o

 

Fast break – indicates broad root canal has split into 2 smaller roots 

o

 

Bullseye – indicates root apex has curved either straight buccal or straight lingual 

Radiolucent lesions of endodontic origin 

-

 

Trace PDL from coronal to apex outlining root end 

o

 

Intact lamina dura, uniform PDL 

-

 

Normal 

 widened PDL 

 apical lesions 

 large lesions 

o

 

Loss of lamina dura, hanging drop of water appearance, doesn’t shift from apex in off-angle radiograph 

o

 

Destruction of cancellous bone may not be seen 

 

Only seen on radiograph when cortical plate is affected 

-

 

Pulpal pathosis may not be differentiated on radiograph 

o

 

Vital and necrotic pulps cast the same image on radiographs 

o

 

Tissue in pulp space looks the same regardless of if it is: 

 

Normal 

 

Reversibly/irreversibly inflamed  

 

Necrotic 

17- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

-

 

Apical diagnosis cannot be distinguished solely by radiographic interpretation 

o

 

Metastatic cancer, periapical cemento-osseous dysplasia, periapical cyst/granuloma all look the same 

 

Only PA cyst/granuloma requires RCT (should provide no response to testing) 

-

 

Interpretation of radiographs often misleading 

o

 

47-73% agree between observers 

o

 

75-83% agree for the same observer seen at different times 

Working Radiographs 

-

 

Radiographs for monitoring treatment procedures 

o

 

For orientation on access – use bitewings to gauge depth of the pulp 

-

 

Displays relationship between endodontic instruments/materials to apical portion of root 

o

 

If you need to change working length >1mm, take new radiograph 

-

 

Locating canals – a root will always have a canal 

o

 

Canals may be small and difficult/impossible to locate 

o

 

If single canal, will be positioned in center of the root 

o

 

If canal is skewed off center, another canal is usually present 

-

 

Evaluating cleaning and shaping, obturation 

o

 

MAF – largest file cleaned to, placed in canal for radiographic film 

-

 

Evaluating healing 

o

 

Restitution of normal tissue structures 

o

 

Disease can persist in the absence of signs/symptoms – radiographs essential for evaluating apical 
response to treatment 

-

 

SLOB rule – the canal that is closer to the side of the radiograph corresponding to the same off angle shot is the 
lingual canal, and vice versa 

o

 

Still requires direct straight shot for comparison as off angle shots have distortion 

-

 

Maxilla (SMM) 

o

 

Anteriors – straight shot 

o

 

Premolars – mesial shot 20

o

 

o

 

Molars – mesial shot 20

o

 

 

4 canal molar – mesial shot separates MB1 and MB2, straight and distal shots superimpose them 

-

 

Mandible (DMD) 

o

 

Incisors – distal 20

o

 

o

 

Canines and Premolars – mesial 20

o

 

o

 

Molars – distal 20

o

 

 

 

18- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Radiographic Techniques 

-

 

Paralleling technique 

o

 

Best definition and reproducibility, least distortion 

o

 

Object and film parallel and central beam passes through them perpendicularly 

-

 

Angle bisecting technique 

o

 

Harder to reproduce, some distortion, more superimposition of anatomic structures 

o

 

Film placed directly against tooth without bending film 

o

 

Central beam directed perpendicularly to imaginary line bisecting angle between tooth and film 

-

 

Film holders 

o

 

Diagnostic radiographs – XCP instruments 

o

 

Treatment radiographs – hemostat 

 

Film placement is easier 

 

Hemostat aids in cone alignment 

 

Film held securely in place, less likely to slip 

 

Always place “dot” on film to coronal part of tooth (won’t impose over roots) 

Endodontic Radiography Limitations 

-

 

Radiographs give 2D shadows of 3D objects – require off angle radiographs to see 3

rd

 dimension 

o

 

Maxillary anteriors do NOT require off angle radiographs (only 1 canal) 

o

 

Varying horizontal angulation allows for appreciation of 3

rd

 dimension 

-

 

Vertical angulation 

o

 

Increasing causes foreshortening of images 

o

 

Decreasing causes enlongation of images 

Radiographic Sequence 

-

 

2 diagnostic/pre-Op radiographs 

o

 

1 straight on and 1 off angled (except Mx anteriors) 

o

 

Bitewings should be taken if there is extensive decay/questionable restorability 

-

 

1 working length radiograph 

o

 

If adjustment needed is >1mm, take new radiograph 

-

 

1 MAF radiograph 

o

 

Has largest working length file used at corrected working length inside canal 

-

 

1 Master Cone radiograph 

o

 

If adjustment needed is >1mm, take new radiograph 

-

 

1 Pre-sear radiograph 

o

 

Check for dense fill and no voids 

o

 

Last chance to make changes prior to sear off 

-

 

2 Post-op radiographs 

o

 

1 straight on and 1 off angled to evaluate treatment 

 

-

 

For Mx anteriors, a 6 mount is used (only 1 pre-op and 1 post-op) 

-

 

For all other teeth, an 8 mouth is used 

-

 

Radiographs are mounted left to right before starting next row 

o

 

Radiographs are mounted in descending order of list above 

-

 

Date each individual radiograph 

19- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Obturation 

-

 

Eliminates leakage from oral cavity or apical tissues into canal system 

-

 

Seals within the cavity any irritants that are not removed during cleaning/shaping 

Influence on prognosis 

o

 

Poorly obturated teeth are usually poorly prepared 

-

 

Absence of pre-treatment PA lesion 

-

 

RCT without voids 

-

 

Obturation within 2mm of apex 

-

 

Adequate coronal restoration 

When to Obturate 

-

 

Asymptomatic patient 

-

 

Temporary filling is intact 

-

 

Canal is prepared properly 

-

 

Canal is dry or can be dried 

-

 

Prefer to obturate on a different day than instrumenting – allow for healing to asymptomatic state 

Obturation length 

-

 

Ideally at minor constriction (CDJ) 

-

 

Usually 1mm from radiographic apex (based on studies relating major foramen to apex and minor constriction) 

-

 

Extrusion of obturation material decreases healing prognosis and may result in patient discomfort 

-

 

Obturation shorter than 2mm from apex may slow healing, likely from remnant infected tissue left in that 2mm 

-

 

Overfill – total obturation of canal but excess material extrudes out beyond apical foramen 

-

 

Overextension – canal is NOT adequately sealed and material extrudes beyond apical foramen 

Inadequate obturation 

-

 

Long obturation causes 

o

 

Excessive instrumentation beyond apex 

o

 

Excessive penetration of compacting instrument 

o

 

Excessive force during obturation 

o

 

Resorptive defect, perforation, strip perforation, zip 

o

 

Master cone too small 

-

 

Short obturation causes 

o

 

Dentin chips 

o

 

Ledged canal 

o

 

Curved canal 

o

 

Master cone too large 

o

 

Improper 3D shaping of canal in apical to middle third 

 

 

20- Page
background image

Endodontics 

Course Review 

Enoch Ng, DDS 2014 

Obturation preparation 

-

 

Smear layer – cutting debris of mineralized collagen, odontoblastic process remnants, pulp tissue, and bacteria 
that is burnished over dentin surface 

o

 

1-2um thick 

o

 

Can penetrate up to 40um into dentin tubules 

o

 

Can block penetration of sealer into tubules 

-

 

Smear layer removal – irrigation 

o

 

Irrigation with 17% EDTA (chelator) – removes inorganic part of smear layer 

o

 

Irrigation with 3% NaOCl – removes organic part of smear layer 

-

 

Drying the canal 

o

 

Aspiration after irrigation 

o

 

Paper points 

 

Comes in Fine, Medium, Coarse or Tapered to fit final preparation 

 

Let paper point sit in canal for a few seconds to wick moisture 

 

Measure paper points to not induce bleeding or apical inflammation 

Obturation materials 

-

 

Ideal requirements 

o

 

Easily introduced, easily removed 

o

 

Liquid/semisolid and becomes solid, seals laterally and apically, does not shrink 

o

 

Impervious to moisture, bacteriostatic, sterile/sterilizable 

o

 

Does not stain tooth, doesn’t irritate apical tissues, radiopaque 

-

 

Historical materials 

o

 

Silver points 

 

Non-adaptable to canal 

 

Can corrode – releases toxic byproducts into apical tissues 

 

Difficult to remove – post space or retreatment 

o

 

Pastes 

 

Quick to use 

 

Lacks length control – difficult to avoid overfill 

 

Unpredictable/inconsistent seal 

 

Shrinkage of material 

 

Some have paraformaldehyde and arsenic 

-

 

Gutta Percha – trans-isomer of polyisoprene (rubber is cis-isomer) 

o

 

Contains 

 

Zinc oxide (59-75%) 

 

Gutta percha (19-22%) 

 

Waxes, antioxidants, coloring agents, metallic salts 

-

 

Advantages 

-

 

Plasticity, ease of manipulation and removal 

-

 

Minimal toxicity 

-

 

Radiopaque 

-

 

Disadvantages 

o

 

Lack of adhesion to dentin 

o

 

Significant shrinkage on cooling 

 

 

2 distinct crystalline states – alpha and beta 

 

Heating of beta phase (37

o

C) causes structural change to alpha state (42-44

o

C) and then to 

amorphous state (56-64

o

C), with significant shrinkage when returning to beta state 

 

Compaction on cooling is necessary 

thumb_up_alt Subscribers
layers 61 Items
folder Dentistry Category
0.00
0 Reviews